Tag : OST

Written on Aug, 23, 2017 by in | Leave a comment

Because we are social beings, Orthodox moral theology must also pay attention to what is happening in the culture. This is why the evangelical witness of the Church must also include our willingness to comment on the public policy. This is especially important when as George Weigel points out is happening in Canada, governments advance policies that are immoral. Take a …

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Written on Aug, 22, 2017 by in | Leave a comment

Without economic freedom, Orthodox Christians lose the ability to shape a significant portion of our lives according to the Gospel. This is why, even when we disagree on moral grounds with the decisions they make, it is imperative that we defended the economic freedom of others.

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Written on Apr, 03, 2017 by in | Leave a comment

Over at Fr Aidan Kimel’s blog Eclectic Orthodoxy, I have a post reflecting on how Orthodoxy Christians might want to respond to the recent presidential election. In the post I ask How then are we as Orthodox Christians to live? How do we go about fostering “peace and co-operation among people holding various political views”? While the hierarchy and the clergy …

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Written on Mar, 28, 2017 by in | Leave a comment

Millions of working age American men don’t have a job and aren’t looking for one. They’ve simply vanished from the U.S. labor force. What are they doing? Caring for kids? Going to school?

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Written on Mar, 16, 2017 by in | Leave a comment

NIMBY is just one specific physical manifestation of a broader mentality of stasis. There is also:  NIMEY—Not In My Election Year  NIMTOO—Not In My Term Of Office  LULU—Locally Undesirable Land Use  NOPE—Not On Planet Earth  CAVE—Citizens Against Virtually Everything  BANANA—Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anything  One upshot of this current Zeitgeist of community-enforced social stasis is that our physical infrastructure …

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When we close down free trade, or allow others to close it down for us, we lose not only the material advantages that it brings to us as individual consumers, as producers, and as a nation. We lose the moral advantages that it brings us as well.

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Whatever might be the contemporary roots of Hart’s moral reasoning on economics, his argument that wealth is evil is more in keeping with the thought of the early Christian heretic Pelagius than with, for example, Ambrose, Augustine, Basil the Great and John Chrysostom. These fathers were all critical of wealth and the wealthy but avoided the extremes found in Pelagius.

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Written on Apr, 19, 2016 by in | Leave a comment

If humanity collectively decided to stop buying pointless junk, the economy wouldn’t grind to a halt. Far from it. Read more: A capitalist critique of consumerism

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Written on Apr, 07, 2016 by in | Leave a comment

But as is often the case, saying we have too much stuff not only begs a number of questions, it fails to deal with consumerism as in fact a moral problem. Instead, the critique that we have too much stuff uncritically assumes a crude, materialistic understanding of human economic activity. As a result, the proposed solutions (typically, less stuff, more regulations), undermines human moral agency not just in the arena of economic activity but in other areas of human life.

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Written on Oct, 02, 2015 by in | Leave a comment

A right that can’t be enforced isn’t particularly valuable. As we’ve seen, the canons of the Church assume a basic right to property. The question now is whether Orthodox Social Thought (OST) offer more than merely theoretical support to property.

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